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on washington with those who lived it. >>> yesterday tens of thousands of americans converged on the nation's capital to commemorate the 50 th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. it was a historic event that spurred the enactment of the civil rights and voting rights act and one that is now remembered as one of the moral high points of american history. but that is not what political leaders, major media outlets and millions of everyday americans were expecting right up until that march began in 1963. they were bracing for violence and chaos. they were fearing strident and inflammatory rhetoric and they were convinced the main effect of the rally would be to inflict a grievous wound, maybe even a fatal wound, on a very movement it sought to advance. that is the context in which the march took place 50 years ago this week. context that can and all too often is lost to history. it came at a particularly crucial and politically sensitive time in the civil rights movement. three months before the march, in may of 1963, demonstrations in birmingham -- excuse me, demonstrators in birming
the dream and the dreamer 50 years later. >> thousands of people making their way through washington, d.c. for days of festivities marking that historic speech from dr. martin about howg jr. and the march on much this day this movement has changed life for africa americans. what has it meant for if you? >> well, the original march was a turning point for me in my life because it was the first time that i was able to really stand up for what i believed. i knew it was right. i knew it was right to my bones to go to >> yeah 7. >> for his take on today's event gas thevent, for the first timee have whites and blacks in intimate settings, allowed to go to church together, organize together, it was those relationships away from the camera, away from the microphones that allowed folks to get to know each other in ways that they hadn't been able to get to know each other before. >> reporter: mr. neil there is so much emphasis on dr. king, but the movement took place in basements around the countriers people who were afraid they would lose their jobs. >> these are folks who were organizers at the
of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream. >> good morning from washington. it's friday august 23, 2013. i'm chuck todd. this is a special edition of "the daily rundown." we're looking ahead to the 50th anniversary of that famous 1963 march on washington. for many americans, 50 years ago feels like yesterday. but of course for millions of others, including myself who weren't even born yet, in an ironic way, the grand memorial of granite and marble that now stands might make that history feel more distant. particularly for many young people today. we remember dr. king's march as an historical event. through grainy film and archive photos. but for each of us, those four words, "i have a dream," have a different and special renaissanreno sans. since then, every political protest in this country has borrowed from what the leaders of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were able to achieve. tomorrow, thousands will retrace their steps. next week, president obama will mark the 50th anniversary of the march with a speech on the steps of the lincoln memorial. i
, is to follow the efforts in washington today to present all of the options. >> so you do believe there would have to be a man date first from an international body? >> that's what he has said. if he can't get the united neighborhoods there are other man datas he could look for. >> is at this point all hope for diplomatic solution lost. >> it's very hard to see a diplomatic solution. the opposition has dis united. the government made up its mind to crush the rebellions and uprisings that were occurring around at a time country. it's going to be very hard to get people negotiating for a solution. >> all right. ambassador richard murphy, we thank you so much for coming in this morning. >> pleasure. >>> it's shaping up to be a beautiful morning across the northeast. high pressure is in control. and we continue to deal with nothing but sunshine. take a look. hard to find anything here on the radar. clear skies. we did have a cold front push through earlier on the week. luckily, now, the skies are shaping up. it's going to be a gorgeous day temperaturewise, nice and comfortable. in albany, 76. new
anniversary of the march on washington. inside story is next. >>> 50 years after the march on washington there are lingering challenges to the modern social justice movement and a modern debathe as to how to accomplish dr. king's dream. this is inside story. hello everybody i'm david shuster, it was called a march for jobs and freedom. hundreds of thousands of peaceful protestors gathered on the national mall and ignited a new conversation about civil rights in america. highlighted by the march and by dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech are still alive today. still ahead, we'll examine inquality and social justice. finally, we'll take you to an organizer who was there. joyce ladner. >> i had a stage pass. no one on that stage had ever seen that many people before. that's the major one memory. i have a lot of others as well. >> was it an energetic crowd? was it a me mesmerized crowd? >> it was a very friendly crowd. it was almost like meeting new friends. it was easy going. it was an easy crowd. >> was there a sense that eventually society would progress and things would ch
>>> on the broadcast tonight from washington -- ready to strike. the u.s. prepare as military attack on syria, but tonight the house speaker tells the president to slow down. we'll take a closer look at the possible consequences of american military action. >>> remembering the dream. 50 years after dr. king's historic speech, a huge crowd comes here to celebrate, remember and inspire the nation to finish the job. >>> death sentence for the army psychiatrist convicted in the massacre at fort hood. >>> and air scare. a new warning tonight about the wildfire at yosemite and what it's doing to the air people are breathing so many miles away. "nightly news" begins now. >>> and good evening. i'm lester holt in for brian. here in washington, talk of war and peace at the lincoln memorial where martin luther king jr. delivered his famous "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago today. president obama headlined a chorus of speakers saluting the racial justice that changed this country. a lot more on that in a few minutes. >>> but first, the remmings in this city about a possible military at
speaking, turkey, saudi arabia and cutter. >> washington and london compared to -- prepared for possible strikes against serial -- serious military targets. >> let's go now to washington and our correspondent there. what is the latest you are hearing about how the talks have been going in the u.n.? >> russia and china did not back the draft resolution, condemning their use of chemical weapons by the assad regime and asking for permission to take all necessary measures to protect civilians. the draft resolution would authorize force to protect civilians from chemical weapons. it was not a big surprise, at least not for me. after a meeting in the security council, the ambassadors in france and the united kingdom came together in a meeting behind closed doors and now they are consulting with governments in paris, london and washington. i don't expect any u.n. resolution today or tomorrow. >> the british foreign secretary says talks at the u.n. need to go on for a few more days. does that mean an imminent attack is off the table? >> i don't think this is true. i think the americans and briti
. in washington. fox news. >> iraqi war veteran accused of killing a navy seal sniper has been arraigned. shot and killed chris kyle and another man at a texas gun range. suffering from dtp to the range for therapy. the 25 year old held on 3 million dollars bond. army sergeant will face the victim's families. jury selection began for report bails. bails admitted to killing 16 afghan villagers mostly women and children. boys who survived will take the stand. >> news alert oust georgia a gun man armed fired shots in an elementary school. happened in deicature outside of atlanta the suspect got in the school following someone authorized to be there. fired a shot in the air. school was put on lock down. no one was hurt they were reunited with their relieved parents. >> been a lot on your heart much see what is going on in the news and not know what is going on. good to know no one was hurt it was a waiting thing. as far as the waiting i can't complain all the kids were safe. that's all want is your child to come home safe. suspect was arrested. authorities believe he had combloesive in his trunk
on washington. we are sharing them. it is 7:11.  junk keys junkies junki rise and shine for school, kids. this is a picture of amber makel who is a junior in high school. this is her. it is not a selfie, she looks great. thank you for tweeting this, amber. what about this? this sharp young man, this is dominic jones, ready for kindergarten at imagine foundation. that is so cute. have a great day and great year, dominic. thanks for sending a picture. i love the students in their uniform. they are the cutest thing in their ties. they look so professional. first day of school in calvert, maryland. more pictures should be coming in. you high schoolers tweet us@myfoxdc. we have seen some cute ones. the little uniform. looking like a businessman ready to go to school. love it. >> i know. i asked the kids, what is your job? >> we are students. >> it is. you have to take it seriously. >> did you take it seriously? >> we are a close group of co-workers. what is going on out there? >> the fog is thick in spots. not so much in the city although we have it along the potomac. i have
. ♪ >>> welcome back to a special edition of "politicsnation." the march on washington: the dream continues. >> good evening. i'm al sharpton continuing our special coverage live from the lincoln memorial on the national mall. 50 years ago, the eyes of the nation were on this spot where hundreds of thousands of people converged on history. people of all races from all walks of life joining hands in the name of justice and civil rights. in this hour, we'll hear from some of the people who traveled so far to attend this march. including the young girl shown in this iconic photo. i'll talk to her now 50 years later about how the march changed her life. we also have my interview with congressman john lewis from the steps of lincoln memorial where he spoke a half a century ago. i'm honored to begin the second hour of our show tonight with bernie a. king, ceo of the king center. thank you for being here today. >> thank you. glad to be here. >> you head the king center where your mother founded many years ago. and you have struggled and worked to keep the legacy of your mother and father alive. an
to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. i et a man not long ago, tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, you're right. civil rights didn't write your resume. but civil rights made somebody ead your resum
it in 50 years. the 1963 march on washington. >> now back to roger mudd. >> here at the lincoln memorial, the sight that is almost something no washingtonian has beheld. >> news reports from the march along with coverage of the civil rights movement helped change minds about the protesters and the fight to end segregation. we'll talk with the reporters who were there, including dan rather, who reported for cbs news and paul delaney, a founding member of the national association of black journalists. >>> plus "the new york times" says espn dropped its partnership with public tv's "front line" when the nfl objected to a documentary about head injuries. does this show the influence sports leagues have over sports journali journalism's biggest player? >>> and are you one of the movie goers that made this the top-grossing film last weekend? >> there he is. what's your name sdm. >> cecil gaines. >> i'm carter wilson, head butler. >> did you know the story of "the butler" began with one reporter's quest for the ultimate white house insider? we'll talk with the "washington post"'s wil haygood ab
approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
rights movement. to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. i am proud to stand before you as the first african-american, first woman city administrator. >> [applause] >>thank you. i i am grateful to be inspired and mentored by many great civil rights leaders and my educational leaders which includes usf law school. >> [applause] >> and my family members who have mentored me and have paved the way for me along my career path. i could not have gotten there without them. my greatest inspirations are my parents william little and maria little, and i my greatest inspirations are my parents william little and maria little, and i want to talk about howthey were inspired by the march on washington and dr. king's speech which subsequently has passed on to me. my mother was among the 200,000 people who joined dr. martin they were inspired by the march on washington and dr. king's speech which subsequently has passed on to me. my mother was among the 200,000 people who joined dr. martin luther king on the march on washington 50 years ago and stood up for the rights for freedom.
be a lie. >> got my attention. priceless memories, firsthand witnesses to march on washington gathered in d.c. for a special celebration. we are going to take you there. >> first honoring the best of the best, '72 dolphins get their white house moment. only taken 37 years. 7:09, we'll be right back. ask me what it's like to get your best night's sleep every night. [announcer] why not talk to someone who's sleeping on the most highly recommended d in america? ask me about my tempur-pedic. ask me how fast i fall asleep. ask me about staying asleep. [announcer] tempur-pedic owners are more satisfied than owners of any traditional mattress brand. tempur-pedic. the most highly recommended bed in america. buy a tempur-pedic mattress set and get a free twin tempur-simplicity mattress. find a store near you at tempurpedic.com. ♪ turn around ♪ every now and then i get a little bit hungry ♪ ♪ and there's nothing good for me around ♪ ♪ turn around ♪ every now and then i get a little bit tired ♪ ♪ of craving something that i can't have ♪ ♪ turn around barbara ♪ i finally found t
i frequently tell my washington colleagues -- everything is bigger in texas but me. if you can't see me, you can at least hear me. i was delighted to accept the invitation to speak before the bipartisan policy center for a couple of reasons. number one is because of the outstanding work you have done in the housing arena and number two, i live about re-miles from here so it took me about seven minutes to get here. as a fairly new chairman of a standing committee of congress, i have a number of speaking invitations that come my way. a lot of press is interested in speaking to me me but i assure you, i don't have to work to remain humble. i accept the number of them and my home, i was working on one of those speeches after dinner and my wife who helps keep me humble, comes into my study and says -- ok, in washington, you made me mr. chairman but in dallas, you are mr. dishwasher and they are not getting any cleaner. i took my wife's subtle hand and dropped the speech and went into the kitchen and began to work on the dishes. a few minutes later, the phone rings and she picked it up and
are coming, indeed. ron mott, thank you. "the washington post," as was recognized by the post itself this past weekend barely mentioned the reverend king speech because he was the last speaker. they had gone to to press and it was not really notable to a lot of reporters who were covering it here in washington, d.c. you've been following this from our bureau in washington. all of these reflections of history come together. identify talked to jesse jackson today and he said this is the moment where president obama needs to do what lbj did and set out a legislative mandate for the dream and that voting rights is a constitutional amendment. that's the focus. that and on economic injustice and equality. >> i think it also puts a spotlight on the relationship between presidents like kennedy or president obama and a leader like martin luther king. let's go back to reality. in the sprachk 1963 president kennedy did not want this march to happen. he thought it would get out of control. he thought it might have speakers like john lewis who would go in directions more radical. he kept his deta
gathered in washington, d.c. again. former presidents, celebrities and every day americans were there. >> near two weeks, firefighters are till fighting that fire out in california. we'll have the latest news coming up at 11:00 here on aljazeera. ♪ theme ♪ theme >> as the u.s. may be drawing closinger to intervention in syria polls vin to show a large majority of americans oppose military action. how can the u.s. build an international coalition when its leaders can't build one here at home? also, twitter, google and "the new york times" websites suffer cyber attacks. a group connected to the syrian government is the likely culprit. how vulnerable is america's cyber infra structure to another attack. >> the women who worked side by side with the men during the civil movement the were given their proper due. >> we begin with syria, and how an attack that seemed eminent may be less so now. president obama it is he hasn't yet decided to take action. while britain, france and turkey are open to military intervention, the u.n. and arab league are far from a consensus. as we report, ave
breaking news. i apologize. it's regarding the "washington post." and mary thompson has that very interesting story. mary? >> really interesting. jeff bezos, the founder of amazon.com, will be buying the newspaper publishing businesses of the "washington post" for $250 million. now, bezos is buying this with an entity that is his alone. this does not have anything to do with amazon.com. so it's basically a personal acquisition. the transition -- the transaction covers the "washington post," the newspaper, and other publishing businesses, including the express newspaper, the gazette newspapers, southern maryland newspapers, fairfax county times, greater washington publishing. what it doesn't include is slate magazine, the root.com and foreign policy. they're not part of the transaction, and will remain with the "washington post" company, as will wapo labs and social code businesses. once again, jeff bezos is paying $250 million for the newspaper publishing businesses of the "washington post." he has asked katherine wamuth, the ceo and publisher of the "washington post," as well as
washington post" gets bought by amazon billionaire jeff bazzos. how did the media react to the news? what will this mean for the future of the newspaper business? >> you have the republican chairman -- i would say understandably miffed about these hillary clinton film. >> even some folks at nbc against the peacock plan to produce a miniseries about hillary clinton to run before she runs for president. and the head of the rmc takes a stand. demanding nbc and cnn drop their clinton projects. how will this fall in? >>> oprah speaks out about the trayvon martin shooting. did her words help or hurt racial tensions? democrats have become the targets of late night jokes. >> yesterday was the president's birthday. he didn't let work get in the way of having a good time. take a look at this speech. >> you will interact with americans from all walks of life because -- our citizens can learn from you, too. >> judy miller, columnist and fox news contributor and jim pinkerton be contributing editor of the american conservative magazine. ellen ratner, top radio news service bureau chief. fox news contr
and what is next for the controversial site in nevada tomorrow morning on c-span's "washington journal." thank you for joining us on this sunday. hope you enjoyed the rest of your weekend. "newsmakers" is next. have a great weekend. ♪ >> today on c-span, the ceo of" with heritage for american action, michael needham. john mccainlls with a nancy pelosi. ourelcome to "newsmakers" guest is michael needham. the ceo of heritage action for america. it was founded three years ago. thanks for being our guest. let me introduce our reporters. bob cusack is the managing editor of the hill. .> let's go right to obama care this is the issue that is facing the gop. why do you think republicans can do this? before republicans have funded obama care. the election did not fix much. --may have the democratic the only have democratic control. >> for the last three or four years republicans were all elected on the promise to get rid of obamacare and have relied on someone else coming in and saving the day. the supreme court will come in and rule it unconstitutional. the american people are going
king, jr.'s, famous, i have a dream speech in washington. >> more people there than i have ever seen in one place in my entire life. >> hear from a bay area woman who attended that historic march and how she and others are commemorating king's legacy. >> vendors supplying your produce, fighting for space. no more. the new plan to bring them all under one roof. >> it is back. a chance a authority back in the forecast. we'll pinpoint the location as the news continues right here on the cw. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, washington today, to commeme >>> tens of thousands of people packed the national mall in washington today to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the historic march on washington for civil rights. family members of reverend martin luther king, jr., delivered his famous, i have a dream speech at the march led today's event along with other civil rights leaders. >> this is not the time for a commemoration, nor is this the time for self-congratulations celebration. the task is not done. the journey is not complete. >> some of those in the crowd had attended the march 50 years ago, the
decades ago in front of majestic lincoln memorial in washington dc. the march on washington was an assemblage of people in power converging on washington dc, our nations capital, only occasionally seen every few decades. a quarter of 1 million americans march on washington that hot summer day. each representing thousands and thousands of americans were standing up for both racial equality and job opportunities. across the nation. now i will defer to our main speaker, the man who is there and whose words you will soon hear them up but this was the largest public gathering in washington dc until that time in our nations history. only surpassed by some of the antiwar marches that followed later in the 60s. african-americans, teachers, students, union workers, 30 of all creeds and people of many walks of life, came together to appeal to the conscience of the nation and demand action that would enable the patient to live up to our constitutional ideals. that would free african-americans from the shackles of poverty and discrimination and free all of us from the reality of segrega
. seven blacks and six whites left washington, d.c. on two buses they headed south. at first, only minor hostility greeted them. but when one bus arrived in birmingham alabama, a mob surrounded them and beat the freedom fighters. >> i was on the greyhound, that was the bus they set on fire. burned it. and we would have all burned to death had it not been for the fact that one of the fuel tanks of the bus exploded, scared the hell out of the mob. >> reporter: that ride ended abruptly and the riders feared the violence would snuff out the movement. the first ride was not the last. students willing to face death picked up the cause boarding buses heading south. in his san francisco home, frank nelson shares his story with blankenhide. nelson took his first ride in june, by then the movement had spread to trains. >> they got off the train and headed to the homes that were right there. the black riders went into the whites homes and they were carted off to jail. >> reporter: nelson was 23 when his body was bruised and beaten. >> friend, i'm a mississippi segragist and i'm proud of it. >> repo
washington. helping to kick off our special coverage, chris matthews, host of msnbc "hardball" is live in washington, d.c. at the lincoln memorial and where all of today's event will take place. chris, good morning. let's set the scene for everybody. as we understand the program for today, we have three presidents, a host and current and former future civil rights and leaders and politicians taking the stage. truly a diverse program but we all look back 50 years ago to those vivid images that still inspire today. >> thomas, this is going to be a hot day. it's not that hot. it's sweltering today but not as bad as it could get in washington. it's drizzling and may clear up. i expect there is heated rhetoric today. this country is divideded right now, heavily and sharply divided between the one reject an african-american president and rejected him from the day he was elected and the day they heard he might be elected. the other half of the country almost pouting with this illusion right now. gee whiz. why isn't this greater? pef an african-american president and things not happen
our march on washington conversation series, as a father and son reflect on what that event has young people were found with courage and some often radical symptoms, i wouldn't have the >> ifill: and we close with the story of army staff sergeant ty michael carter, who received the nation's highest military honor today for his bravery druing the war on afghanistan. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the united states insisted today it is "undeniable" that syria's rulers gassed their own people last week, just outside damascus. that was coupled with new warnings of repercussions yet to opportun
is. the sale of "the washington post" is a tricky matter for the si single reason it is an original source of knowing what you and i should know about. and that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "all in with chris hayes" starts right now. >>> good evening from new york. i am in for are the great chris hayes. tonight on "all in" the sale of "the washington post" yesterday to billionaire jeff besos. i have thoughts and even feelings about all this since i actually work there. that is coming up. also tonight president obama makes a return to phoenix to talk about the great american dream of owning your own home. i submit homeownership isn't for everybody. it shouldn't be tax deductible. but first, did anything really interesting happen where you worked yesterday? >> the "the post" has been sold to jeff besos. >> every graham, not the only everybody but at the top of "the washington post" company had the same reaction when they started to think about the possibility which was great surprise. it was good for "the post. "we knew we could keep "the post" alive. our aspiration
'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. reince priebus is on the warpath again. the rnc chairman who has made bones trying to suppress african-american votes now has a plan to suppress the free media. having waged war on the 15th amendment, the one that gave african-americans the right to vote, he is now batting down the hatches on a free press. priebus's plan, which he described last night is to take control of the republican nominating process, deciding who will be the moderators of the debates, which debates will be authorized and which networks will be allowed to sponsor them. he, reince priebus will henceforth decide who gets to moderate the debates, where they will be permitted and which networks will be given the privilege of sponsoring them. he reince priebus will decide this big push for personal control is consistent with his oversight of a major republican plan to make it harder for minorities, the elderly and young voters to cast ballots. having loaded people down with more document requirements, voter photo i.d. cards and the rest and few opportunit
to this country. have done great damage to the american culture. to the american psyche. >> washington doesn't want to find a -- 1/6 of the economy is gone. the government took it. i don't think the rest of the world is enamored with obama. i love radio. radio is the single greatest opportunity i have to be who i am. >> rush limbaugh on the record. and you hear rush say things you never heard him say before. but first, in our one-on-one interview, rush limbaugh tells us what he thinks of president obama's phony scandal campaign. >> let me ask you, talking about the scandals, president obama says the scandals are phony. why do you thinkhe says they're phony? because he believes it or is there a strategy? >> there's a strategy. i've been troubled by something with the obama i playfully call it the regime as i know it irritates him. it is much like a regime. i've been troubled, i've been amazed. here is a man whose policies have done great damage to this country. policies have done great damage to the economy. have done great damage to the american culture, to the american psyche. i mean, there
of blacks in the white house. >> yes. >> this is a q&a for a couple of years ago about the martha washington's slave -- pick it up at the end. >> she found out early 1796 that martha washington was planning to give her away as a wedding gift. during slavery, slaves were given away. this was upsetting for her. because when they died, they would free individuals who were slave to them. and she had hoped down the road she would be out of the institution. but if she's going to be given away, that meant her whole life was going to be in slavery. she's going make plans to escape. she writes, she talks about later, one evening, late spring, 1796 while the washingtons were silting at the dinner table waiting for her to serve them, she went out the back door. rather than say, you know, she escaped, we don't like it, but we'll leave it alone. george decides to kidnap her. they send a nephew back to kidnap her which was actually fairly common. >> how many stories in history like this, slaves in the white house? >> many stories. there were african-americans in the white house, except the james buchanan
and from her tenure as publisher and ceo and chair of the board of "the washington post" company. mrs. graham was at the helm of "the washington post" during that era of the pentagon papers and watergatwatergat e. in august of 2013 "the washington post" was sold to amazon founder jeffrey pesos. this is about one hour. c-span: katharine graham, author of "personal history," did your children learn anything from this book about you? >> guest: that's a hard question. i'm sure they probably did, but i couldn't tell you exactly what. c-span: all the stuff in here about your early life and your husband and all that, did they know that? have you-all talked that out? >> guest: yes, i think they understand that he was ill. they--the oldest one was 20, and the youngest one was 11, so they had to deal with it then and always. c-span: the question i had after i read the book was, 'why do you want us to know all this?' >> guest: i really don't suppose that i meant to just tell everything to everybody. but once i sat down to write my story, i just tend to be frank and open, and i wanted to be very
. >>> as dawn broke on washington, d.c., 50 years ago today, no one knew what to expect. dr. martin luther king, junior had been up most of the night in his room writing and rewriting the speech he was to give that day, though the most sub lime passage would never appear on that page. the earliest press reports that morning suggested that only about 25,000 people would show up. organizers of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were nervous. putting out fires, working behind the scenes to keep the collision behind the march in tact and preparing to channel the sea of humanity that they hoped to call forth. and then the buses and the trains came, and the people came with them by the thousands. and by that afternoon, more than 200,000 people, black and white spread out before the shadow of the great emancipator, disciplined and skeweding the spirit of solidarity. they listened to speakers one by one who called the nation to meet the demands that justice placed upon it, and about 2:40 in the afternoon, the last speaker rose to the lectern. some fretted the tv cameras would be gone by the t
"politicsnation" starts right now with reverend al sharpton live from washington, d.c. rev, that had to be one heck of a day in american history to be a part of that. >> no, i was very honored to be part of it. it was an exciting day, a great day. we're going to talk about it on "politicsnation," ed. and you did a great job saturday at the march. we really enjoyed you. you have a little preacher in you. >> i do. i haven't unleashed it all yet, rev. >> all right. all right. >> "politicsnation" starts right now here on msnbc. rev, take it away. >> all right. thank you, ed. thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, the dream lives on 50 years after dr. martin luther king jr. inspired the nation. america's first african-american president reminded us -- reminded all of us that today's economic inequities mean there's still much more work to do. i was there for the day's commemoration as some 100,000 people gathered to hear more than 200 speakers. everyone from former presidents, carter and clinton, to activists and civil rights leaders. at points there was a spontaneous song
the new york time yesterday and also washington post and as you said, a lot of social media and other important media in the western world -- >> it's getting worse. the problem is that they are not even that sophisticated, i mean, in fact, we saw how -- we know that some of them are what we call -- they do not launch complex attacks, but those attacks are out there launching and working. that's my big concern now. >> we've heard for years that cyber attacks could take out power grids, financial markets, banks and officials have done drills and simulated attacks. we're going to show you one called cyber shock wave, produced by the bipartisan policy center, including a whole officials. >> the country's internet system is now slowing down to a virtual crawl. communications with financial trading houses are almost at a stand still. >> it is an active war. you turn off everybody's cell phone, you don't allow them to bank, work, communicate be this is an attack on the united states. it may not be a bomb, but it's much more significant than a bomb going off. >> scary simulation there. what s
on anniversary of the march on washington, and the legacy of martin luther king jr.. series, first ladies, influence and image. over the next couple of hours, we will visit places with history curators. away fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation. >> it is clear that martha arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support sys
por espionaje... miles de estudiantes universitarios regresaran a clases en washington, pero recibiran un duro golpe en su economia.. y es que segun un informe, el costo para estacionarse en los planteles incrementara consideradamente... claudia uceda nos tiene los detalles.. daniel empieza su vida universitaria en la capital y aun no sabe si necesitara un auto. daniel aizenman/estudiante universitario " aun no tengo un plan, podria considerarlo." estos padres ya dejaron a su hijo en los dormitorios del campus de american university, ellos son conscientes que su hijo tendra que tomar decisiones. samuel aizenman/padre de daniel "me imagino que es el quien va a tener que lidiar con este costo. sabra si va a tener que tener carro, una bicicleta o nada ..." futuro que le puede costar muy caro a muchos estudiantes que llegan a la capital... ya que de acuerdo con la triple a los costos de los permisos para estacionar vehiculos en universidades han aumentado en algunos casos como un 80 porciento jeanette tejada/portavoz aaa "el estacionamiento es muy limitado y caro en washington dc..." el es
't it be nice if we had her back in washington now. >> we only skimmed the surface in 90 minutes of 81 entering years of life. if you want to learn more. i thank the white house historical association for their ♪elp in this series. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> on c-span tonight, libyan activist discuss. then another chance to watch "first ladies" on the life of dolley madison. >> coming up on the next "washington journal," -- 's tomorrow night, on c-span encore presentation of "first ladies" -- is not>> campaigning allowed. you cannot do that and you cannot ask for office directly. you have used subtle back channels. women were a good conduit for that. come to spread their gossip and ask their favors. she knows she cannot trust these people. she is not naÏve. a lot of them are spreading false information, false gossip, they are misleading and have all of their own agendas. she is aware of the political gain going on and is not a fan. >> the encore presentation continues tomorrow night at 9:00 eastern o
-perry. live this morning from washington, d.c. where thousands of people turned out to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march on washington for jobs and freedom yesterday. only one man who spoke from the steps of the lincoln memorial five decades ago remains alive today, congressman john lewis, and he spoke forcefully. >> i got arrested 40 times during the '60s, beaten, left bloody and unconscious. but i'm not tired, i'm not weary. i'm not prepared to sit down and give up. i am ready to fight and continue the fight, and you must fight. >> although the architect of the march has passed away, many of the inequities that prompted the struggle remain firmly in place. in 1963 the march called for equal access to jobs, fair wages, unfettered voting rights and intraracial segregation, access to decent health care, schools, housing. half a century later the struggle continues. the struggle continues for decent work and humane conditions that pays a living wage of the nationwide unemployment rate is 7.4%. for african-americans it's 12.6%. for young african-american men between 20 and 24 the u
. >> so what's the president doing? four speeches in seven days. >> if folks in washington really want a grand bargain, how about a grand bargain for middle class jobs? >> but while washington waits for a bargain, millions of american workers feel they're getting a raw deal. fast food workers across the country who say they can't afford to live where they work, walking off the job to demand higher wages. now the economy is adding jobs, but those new jobs pay less than the ones lost during the recession. the president worries the growing income gap will fray america's social fabric. even the good news isn't as good as it seems. amazon adding 5,000 warehouse jobs. the company's warehouse workers take home just $24,000 a year, barely above the poverty line. america may still be the land of opportunity, but those opportunities pay less and less. in brazil, in greece, in france, we've seen protesters take to the streets in those countries demanding economic reform, demanding workers' rights, financial fairness. in short, a better life. could we see that kind of fervor here in the united sta
shocker. the washington post company sells its number and publishing assets to amazon.com founder. the deal capped the day of big news in print, online and in television. >> looser lending. new reports say banks are lowering standards for businesses, consumer and home buyers. does it signal a return to the bad old days of too easy credit? >> home grown, walmart pledges to buy american made goods. how it could affect manufacturing. we kick off a special series called made in america. >> it was a stunning late day capper today to a day of major news affecting the newspapers you read, the websites you visit, the tv networks you watch, and the cable systems you may subscribe to. amazon.com founder and ceo is buying the publishing business of the washington post company. which includes the fames newspaper for $250 million. the post long run by members of the eugene meyer and graham families reached the peak of its fame for tough reporting, during the watergate era. baso says, i understand the critical role the post plays in washington, d.c., and our nation, and the post's values will n
night at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, sarah polk, mark rhett taylor and abigail fillmore. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] sarah polk was on diplomacy and her strong suit is intelligence and political discussion. >> she made no bones about the fact she took an interest in politics. and that she was her husband's partner. >> she grew naup political household in tennessee. her father was a local politician so she grew up loving politics. she married james after he won a seat in the legislature. because she would not have married him if he had -- >> unfortunately for james k. polk he died three months after leaving the white house. and sarah began a 42-year widowhood. polk place became a shrine to her husband and she would invite anybody who wanted to to come to visit and see the objects she had collected through her long and illustrious political career. >> to live there for many years on her own. during the civil war, generals on both
hope you enjoy the rest of the time in your home district which you prefer to washington but we look forward to having you back there for the important work ahead. thank you. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national >> on satellite corp. 2013] the next washington journal, the that end challenges facing the country. we will talk to robert bixby. and as part of our cargo ship from kaiser health news, julie appleby on the administration's to station is to delay limits on out-of-pocket expenses for people buying health insurance. and a ruling on the nuclear .egulatory commission's review in washington correspondent of the las vegas sun. "washington journal," live at 7 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> what is interesting about washington in this age is that once you have that title, even if it is a very short title, even if you have been voted out after one term, you can stay in washington and be a former chief of staff, a former congressman, a former chief of staff to congressman x or y. that is marketable. you are in the club. that is a s
be the secretary of dhs is the most thankless job in washington. that is not true. no doubt, it is a very big and comics job. it is literally a 24/7 job, that as my successor will soon learn, it is also one of the most rewarding jobs there is. what you do hear matters to the lives of people all across our great nation him and your decisions affect them in direct and tangible ways. you make sure their families are safe from terrorist threats, that their local first responders have equipment and training and funding, and that when disaster strikes people who have lost everything are given food and shelter and hope. and that thanks for that is not owed any single individual or cabinet secretary, but to that 240,000 dhs employees, many of whom work in tough conditions around the clock to accomplish our shared and noble mission, and that includes some who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. they are the backbone of your nation's homeland security, and over the past 4 1/2 years, it has been my pleasure to serve with them and build a more agile department of homeland security. i thank
communicators." how did you get this gig? >> reviewing tech products? i was a washington reporter for about 20 years and i'm still based in washington but i do not cover washington anymore. in those years, before i did tech i covered national security, the state department, economicsce agencies, , organized labor, environment, deputy bureau chief of "wall street journal." i picked up technology, computers as a hobby. 1980 -- 1981 and in 1991, at my request, i decided that the paper allowed me to switch what i was doing. even though i physically remained here in washington, i began an entirely different gig reviewing these tech products, not just hardware but software, , anything consumer that was digital. and i've been doing that for 23 years. >> if you give something a bad review, it doesn't affect sales of that product? does, but i do not think it always does. it has been written not by me but by others that if i give a good review of it will boost sales of the product. the best comparison is to a movie reviewer. the best movie reviewers will give sterling reviews to some movies that have a
into the newspaper business. amazon founder and ceo jeff bezos acquired "the washington post" this week for $250 million at a time when newspaper revenues have hit a 50-year low. what is bezos saying that other publishers may not be? kara swisher is co-executive etd eter of all thins ding ittal and veteran of "the washington post." good to see you. >> how's it going? >> good. why do you think jeff bezos was interested in the post especially when he acquired it as an individual rather than having amazon buy it? >> it would have been very difficult for the company to buy it. they're already doing so many different experiments that are costly. jeff is someone who is putting off profits for a lot of growth. i think that would have pushed investors over the edge if the company itself bought it. >> that makes sense. but about do you think with his e-commerce experience he can reinvent the newspaper the way he reinvented retail and publishing? >> i'm not so sure. i don't think they're going to start selling kindles from "the washington post." i don't know what that means. he has ideas probably about ci
. and by the end of next week more cameras are expected to be looking at traffic on the west side, washington park on the south side and on the southwest side. >> marking 50 years since an iconic moment in the civil rights moment. next remembering the march on washington. >> and also ahead wounded warriors have been setting off own a bike mission that will take them through three states. >> they had some great weather today. >> they certainly did, bob, but we're on the front end of a heat wave that will bring chicago some of the warmest weather we've seen this summer. i'll have the details and the forecast straight ahead. you know throughout history, folks have suffered from frequent heartburn. but getting heartburn and then treating day after day is a thing of the past. block the acid with prilosec otc, and don't get heartburn in the first place. [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. rescue workers have opened up a lot of dawn. ♪ they rely on it because it's tough on grease yet gentle. but even they'll tell you, dawn helps open... [ all ] 3, 2, 1! [ male announcer
. but increasingly that free press has had quite a high price tag. >> the "washington post," the city's legendary yet struggling newspaper sold to one of the country's wealthiest men, amazon.com chairman jeff bezos. >> the "washington post" is is now owned by the head of amazon and its 14 print subscribers are already noticing one difference because the paper now comes in ludicrously wasteful packaging. but i will say they've made it much easier to return the news if you don't like it. still, this acquisition raises some big questions. first, how do you pronounce that guy's name? (pronouncing it differently n) i don't know. secondly, are you sure that this is a good investment? >> for 0 years the "washington post" has been owned by the grand family earning a reputation for top investigative journalism. but like most papers, it struggled over the past ten years. >> its circulation is half what it was in '93. >> it lost more than $50 million last year. >> john: oh, my god. i think i get it. this is just bezos' car wash. it's a front for a massive meth operation. say his name it's he euvment senbezos. s
jeff bezos. >> everybody at the top of the "washington post" company had the same reaction when we first started to think about the possibility, which was great surprise. the reason we started to think about it is the point of our ownership was it was always supposed to be good for the post. we knew we could keep the post alive. we knew it could survive. but our aspirations for the most have always been hired by that. so we went to see if we could find a buyer. i have spent 42 years of my life working in this building. basically all of my working career. and i'm really devoted to its future and success. >> that's don graham. don graham is the grandson of eugene meyer, who bought the "washington post" in 1933. he's the son of -- he now runs the "washington post" company. he loves the company. he's an amazing, amazing leader. that's don graham saying he's selling the newspaper his family built to amazon founder jeff bezos and he's doing it. he's doing it because he thinks it is necessary for the institution to thrive because the business model that was built around that paper, around
driving the politics and gridlock in washington with two authors and veteran political journalists: robert draper and mark leibovich. >> you do wonder, when people are in office, when people are in power, who are they really working for? are they in it to serve the public good, or are they in it for self-service? >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama took aim at the soaring cost of college today with an ambitious plan to rate schools and link tuition prices to federal financial aid. >> a higher education is the single best investment y
at the 1963 march on washington for jobs on freedom. "he has got the whole world in his hands. >> let us listen please to the words of this song and understand that in the heart of our creator, every soul has the same value and should be valued equally. thank you very much for the opportunity to sing for you. ♪ he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole wide world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. [singing "he's got the whole ♪orld in his hands"] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the honorable john boehner. >> how about a round of applause? [applause] let me thank my colleagues for their testimonials and express my gratitude to all the members of staff of the congressional black caucus in their assistance planning this ceremony. we have many guests. the mayor is here. our attorney general is here. we want to welcome all of you. right now, i have the distinct honor of introducing a great patriot, the recipient of the presidential medal of freedom, a
-span. programs on every first lady, from martha washington. tonight, elizabeth munro and catherine adams. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> elizabeth monroe was a true partner in her husband's career. they were a love story and absolutely devoted to each other. elizabeth monroe had a well- developed sense of style and image. this is a woman who knew how to carry herself with great elegance. >> it is called the era of good feeling. >> this is a woman who spoke french. >> very great beauty. she received is seldom anything in the white house. she hated it. >> dignity, civility. those are the words that come to mind. >> elizabeth monroe served as first lady from 1817 to 1825 as a time known as the era of good feeling. coming up, we will explore her life and what were not always happy times inside the white house for this woman born into a well-to-do new york family. she married james monroe at the age of 17 and traveled new york extensively with him. she brought with her to the white house a certain french
, the struggles of yesterday, and as we're approaching the an vary of the march on washington we have to wonder if the goals of the march on washington were met over the past 50 years. the answer to that is no, they were not. we need people not only as young as my grandchildren, they're great kids, weren't they? not only kids as young as my grandchildren, but people as old as you and i are. we need to put our shoulders to the wheel, ge make sure the figt gets done. >> michael: i don't know what you meant by people as old as you and i, but thank you for coming. i really appreciate it. >>> i'm looking at you, john boehner, politicians are on summer break, and what better place than des moines, really? donnie fowler and my good friend ben mankiewicz will collectively shape their views on that with me. they'll also share them. and ro khama getting ready for the silicon valley house seat. and whether vacationing or campaigning, a book that every lawmaker should have on their summer reading list, a dream foreclosed. i'll talk to the author about the people she met and the courageous action they have
martha washington's slave. out in 1796,ound that martha washington was planning to give her away. during the planning, slaves were away. this was upsetting, because the washington's had promised to free their slaves when they died. and she was going to be given away, that meant that she was going to be in slavery. she may plan to escape. she talks about this later, one whenng, in 1796, washington was sitting at the dinner table, literally, waiting for them to serve him, she escaped. she -- george decides that they are going to kidnap her. that was fairly common. >> how many stories are there like this? >> many. there were always african americans in the white house. james buchanan's administration. were upset.ners he dismissed the african- american staff and brought in irish and english house servants. that is the only time that happened. left the hercules, washington compound and was never found again. they think he was in new york. they do not know. not a lot of effort was made to find him. hise is trouble about slaves and hers. he freed his and he did not free hers. i do not know the
to their center-right readers. and we'll see if jeff bezos can change that with his new "washington post." another week, another so-called major speech from president obama. he says he's ending fannie mae and freddie mac. but i see at least one if not two new government insurance plans. is anything really changing here besides rhetoric? and as the time warner/cbs blackout continues here's the big question. will this speed up the demise of the cable tv model? more and more americans are looking into cutting that cord. all those stories and much more coming up in "the kudlow report," beginning right now. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." first up tonight, a major shake-up at two of the country's most influential newspapers. after four generations of family ownership the "washington post" is selling to amazon ceo jeff bezos. this coming on the heels of the "new york times" fire sale of the "boston globe," unloading the paper to red sox owner john henry for seven cents on the dollar. so what do the "washington post," "the new york times," "the boston globe," an
morning, august 15. ahead on the "washington journal ," your reaction to the latest development in egypt and what the u.s. response should be. you should join the conversation at (202) 585-3880, our line for republicans. (202) 585-3881 for democrats. we also have our line for independents at (202) 585-3882. join us on facebook, send us a tweet, or e-mail address, journal@c-span.org. at somegin with a look of the headlines from outside the u.s., the "guardian" newspaper -- egypt's bloody crackdown. when the story first went to prince, the death toll was 200 78. overnight, the death toll has been updated to 421. there is this from the "miami killed asundreds egypt's forces storm the protest camps. a similar headline from "usa today," egypt the reps in chaos. -- a reps and chaos. from the "wall street journal" website -- egypt's military regime a reps setting off a day of violence that left at least 421 people dead. the government fractured and ties with its international partners in tatters. cairo streets were calm this morning following the curfew overnight with funerals for the dead. fur
have a dream" speech at the lincoln memorial, and thousands today are gathering on the washington mall to celebrate that historic event. >>> we start in syria where the government is now accusing rebel forces of using chemical weapons. the claim comes as president obama meets with his national security team at the white house to talk about the reports of chemical weapons attacks by the syrian government. syrian state tv says soldiers found chemical weapons in tunnels used by rebels. cnn cannot confirm those claims or the authenticity of these images. the opposition claims government forces launched a nerve gas attack, killing hundreds of civilians. meanwhile a top u.n. official is in damascus today asking to investigate the alleged use of chemical weapons by the syrian government. president obama sat down with our chris kuomo earlier and he said the u.s. is still gathering information on the attack. >> what we've seen indicates that this is clearly a big event of grave concern. and we are already in communications with the entire international community. we're moving through the u.n. t
cord, tacoma washington. >> a short time okay t hamid karzi reacted to the bales' sentencing >> a life sentence to him or a death sentence to him will not bring back our children that he killed. if will not bring back the happiness of those families and will not replace the loss that the afghan nation suffered. >>> karzi also said he does not back capital punishment and asked that the u.s. provided compensation to the families of those killed. >>> the sentencing phase of the trial begins made for major nadal hassan. a military jury found him guilty of killing 13 fellow soldiers in 2009. hassan admitted to the murders in court and had no reaction on friday when the guilty verdict was red. the jury will now decide if he will be executed for his crimes or spend the rest of his life in prison. >>> washington state police are hunting for a teenager who is suspected of beating an 88-year-old world war ii veteran to death. another teenager is already in custody for the crime. police found the veteran in his car on wednesday with serious injuries. he died in the hospital yesterday. so far, police do no
were also in washington today to mark this anniversary. >> when i look out over this diverse crowd and survey the guests on this platform, i seemed to realize what otis redding is talking about, and what dr. king preached about, this moment has been a long time coming but a change has come. >> now, it is time for "the last word" with lawrence o'donnell, thank you for joining us, have a great night. >>> 50 years ago tonight, reporters filing stories on a demonstration in washington noted three things. it was peaceful, it was far larger than anyone expected. and a young preacher departed from his planned text. those unplanned sentences have never been forgotten. >> nbc news presents the march on washington. >> i have a dream. >> 50 years later, the dream lives on. >> it was in the middle of battles to break down the walls of apartheid in america. >> martin luther king jr. made a speech, but he also delivered a sermon. >> my father watched from the white house as dr. king and y thousands of others recommitted us to higher ideals. >> injustice is injustice everywhere. >> he gazed at th
on a demonstration in washington noted three things. it was peaceful, it was far larger than anyone expected. and a young preacher departed from his planned text. those unplanned sentences have never been forgotten. >> nbc news presents the march on washington. >> i have a dream. >> 50 years later, the dream lives on. >> it was in the middle of battles to break down the walls of apartheid in america. >> martin luther king jr. made a speech, but he also delivered a sermon. >> my father watched from the white house as dr. king and thousands of others recommitted us to higher ideals. >> injustice is injustice everywhere. >> he gazed at the wall of segregation and saw that the power of love could bring it down. >> martin luther king jr. did not live and die to hear his heirs whine about political grid lock. >> the arc may have bent towards justice, but it doesn't bend on its own. >> for all who are willing to take the flame for justice, i know that flame remains. the tired teacher, the businessman, they are marching. >> we knew fear. the sound of the bells today. let freedom ring everywhere we g
, that change does not come from washington. but to washington. that change has always been built on our willingness, we, the people, to take on the mantle of citizenship. you are marching. and that is the lesson of our past. that is the promise of tomorrow. governor martin o'malley, democrat from maryland. and congresswoman marsha fudge, democrat from ohio and the chair of the congressional black caucus. thank you both for coming on tonight. >> thank you. >> thank you for having me. >> governor o'malley, a powerful day, first of all. >> it was tremendous. >> and there is work to do. >> absolutely. and a lot of this work is happening in states and sadly some of the examples are states that are going backwards. but there's other states like my own state of maryland where even in this recession, we've done the things that advance the cause of justice that are also good for creating jobs. we were named by the u.s. chamber number one for innovation and entrepreneurship and we also have the highest minority business goals. highest womens -- number of women-owned firms starting new business. t
. the march on washington. august 28th, 1963. ♪ >> people of all races, regular people from all walks of life, marching against injustice, marching to change history. >> we are the moral revolution. >> how long? we want our freedom and we want it now. >> a call to ask and a call for peace. a word that inspired a people, a nation and the entire world. >> free at least, free at least. thank god almighty we are free at least. >> tonight a special hour-hour toll particulars nation. the march on washington. the dream continues. >>> good evening. i'm al sharpton live from the lincoln memorial here on the national mall. first years ago hundreds of thousands of people stood where i am right now watching history. millions more watching at home, seeing the leaders of the civil rights movement. call for justice and equality. i talked to him from the exact spot where he can spoke 50 years ago. and we'll hear some of the young people who traveled hundreds of miles to help change the course of history. i'm honored to begin the show tonight with martin luther king iii and reverend joseph lowry, who mean cal
inmigracion entonces no dudaba, no tenia razon para dudar." claudia uceda/ washington, d. c. esta tecnica es muy comun entre estafadores, se llama caller id spoofing o engano de identificador de llamadas. basicamente lo que hace es registrar en su celular el numero del servicio de inmigracion y ciudadania." sin decir cifras de cuantos casos existen, uscis investiga de costa a costa...mientras, el gobierno tiene un mensaje contundente de alerta para el publico: cuelgue el telefono. joanne ferreira/portavoz del servicio de ciudadania e inmigracion (uscis) "cualquier contacto de la agencia viene directamente por escrito y viene en papel oficial. es una cosa oficial, no viene por telefono. nunca se le va a pedir a nadie un pago por telefono." y, si bien es cierto que muchos ya tienen sus respuestas en el caso que reciban estas llamadas... maria velasquez/inmigrante "le diria que me presente los papeles y que lo voy a averiguar." juana salomon/inmigrante "indagar si verdaderamente esa llamada viene de inmigracion." hay aquellos que no saben como reportarlo. eliseo garcia/inmigrante "no creo que
for the washington measures i'm the person on that and for the drug purchasing proponent argument no one will be listed on that because we're not moving forward on the family friendly ordinance. let me see if there are are any thoughts on that increase seeing none, can i see a motion >> without objection it passes. and then on the undertook lying motion as amended can we do that same house, same call. without objection the motion is approved as amended >> madam clerk please read the memorials. >> on behalf of the supervisor campos for the late ms. alicia kerry. >> i want to thank you. this is the last board meeting before our august recess and i hope that everyone has a good recess and i want to thank the public and want to take a moment for sfgovtv and for the staff. and what that any more business for the committee >> no, that includes our business. >> with that madam clerk and everyone that includes our test test, test, test, test, test, test, test okay i'd like to call this meeting to order. hello. good afternoon, everyone thank you so much for coming to disaster council
no washington. mike let's talk about this million stone of a million children as refugees. anyone can relate to a child. is there anything knows a volatile situation there. in kurdistan as we have just heard where the kurds control the area there is a danger of cross-border violence, so not a great situation -- a horrible situation, obviously. the united states so far has donated $1 billion. the state department will be quick to tell you that is more than any other nation, but donating $1 billion towards the refugees, richelle. >> let'sinternational cooperation to address what is happening. i'm going to read you a brief quote. mccain. >> so the debate will continue. mike viqueira thank you so much. >>> at least 29 people are dead and 350 injured after two bombs exploded outside of two mosques. al jazeera is on the ground in the section of tripoli where the second blast occurred. >> reporter: two mosques were targeted in the northern city of tripoli. behind me you can see the destruction and carnage. there is a lot of chaos here. people are angry and upset. we believe they were car bombs and
. ♪ [applause] >> thank you. 50 years ago, they did not take a bus outing to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. [applause] i met a man not long ago, i tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, y
in washington but first this report from jane ferguson. >> reporter: anti-military retestprotests in egypt has cha. they replace the demonstrations. here, around a thousand people gathered around the migathered . >> translator: i'm here to say no with an open chest. i know there are murders from the army and thugs with the police at any moment but i am standing here steadfast with us. >> reporter: the protests are daily now and they are noisy. they are in honor to protest and to avoid the serious crack downs. on tuesday, the anti-coup alliance says it has a new tactic to try to maintain. >> translator: the situation in this is tense what we do in each area and also depends on the curfew. there's demonstrations. every government has its own. some you will find -- the change in protests. >> reporter: the presidential candidate, the country called terrorism. that's the way those supporting the military-led government have been referring to those opposed to them. >> translator: issue needs to be raised. will anyone accept egypt to be a victim of a terrorism. this is the issue, egypt will not accep
>>> coming up, 50 years after dr. king's historic speech in washington, kim lawton reports on an interfaith effort at reconciliation in the community torn by the trayvon martin tragedy. >> how do you judge the content of a person's character? >> and from north carolina, lucky severson has the story of a protest movement called moral monday. >> forward together, not one step back! >> immore monday is a term i have used, and i do believe it is true. >>> major funding for "religion and ethics newsweekly" is provided by the lilly endowment, an indianapolis based private family foundation dedicated to its founders' interest in religion, community development, and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. and the corporation for public broadcasting. >>> welcome. i'm fred de sam lazaro sitting in for bob be aer thety. thank you for joining us. religion groups are among those marking the 50th anniversary of the march on washington with a series of events
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